Start Fake profiles on online dating sites

Fake profiles on online dating sites

The issue of the fake online dating profile continues to escalate like a hurricane, and drown all the real singles out there in online dating land. The issue remains that the anonymity of online dating has opened the flood gates of liars, thieves, cheats, and the sex industry looking to make a quick buck any way they can.

Once they’ve made contact, they will typically request to move the conversation to a private instant messaging service.

He or she will begin the courtship process by sending letters and love poems for a period of weeks and finally offer to fly to meet their victim.

Within hours of the expected arrival time, an emergency will strike: A work visa has expired, or their aunt/niece/child is sick and they need a few thousand dollars to be wired over so they can finally meet their intended.

In many cases, scammers will choose to use pictures of military personnel. Grisham set up a personal blog for soldiers to report their photo being used on online dating sites.

It’s not as simple as some online dating services claim it is.

Singles, both men and women, are under attack from the fakes.

On a false test profile set up by the documentary makers for “James”, 46, from Glasgow, received nearly 500 messages in two months.

One perfect match was “Kazb”, who was using a photograph of Karen Bartke, an actress appearing in several prime-time dramas, including Monarch of the Glen.

After discovering that his headshot consistently showed in hoax dating profiles (thanks to a Google alert), Army Master Sgt. “Over the past few years, I’ve seen these scammers use all kinds of photos removed from open Facebook pages, blogs, official military websites, and command pages,” he wrote in a blog post last month.

“I’ve also seen my own photos and name used.” (The image of Grisham that was used by scammers is pictured, left) With a few of the largest player like OKCupid, Match, and others, there are precautionary measures in place.

In its first law enforcement action against an online dating service, the Federal Trade Commission has reached a settlement that prohibits JDI Dating Ltd., an England-based company, from using fake, computer-generated profiles to trick users into upgrading to paid memberships and charging these members a recurring monthly fee without their consent.