Start Is being intimidating bad

Is being intimidating bad

On a previous blog at the Huffington Post, I used the example of Stephen Colbert's satirical "March to Keep Fear Alive" as a timely illustration of a larger point: humans evolved to be fearful - since that helped keep our ancestors alive - so we are very vulnerable to being frightened and even intimidated by threats, both real ones and "paper tigers." With his march, Colbert was obviously mocking those who play on fear, since we certainly don't need any new reminders to keep fear alive.

I have an interesting relationship with one of my former coworkers.

He and I aren't exactly friends per say, but he holds this special place in my heart.

Also, we’ve both been called “intimidating” by our peers, teachers, and parents, and all of them meant it as a compliment. A lot of girls we know have been called intimidating, so we decided to talk to each other about what this phenomenon actually means.

—Gabby GABBY: Do you remember what if felt like the first time someone described you as intimidating?

I was telling him about my recent relationship woes and his ability to look at the situation in such simple terms was refreshing.

At one point he said, "I wouldn't have expected you to fall into this.

Whether it's an individual who worries about the consequences of speaking up at work or in a close relationship, a family cowed by a scary parent, a business fixated on threats instead of opportunities, or a country that's routinely told it's under "Threat Level Orange" - it's the same human brain that reacts in all cases.